Learning Folk Medicine

*Disclaimer: This post is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any illness. I am not a health care practitioner. Please discuss your personal health with a qualified doctor before making changes to your diet or health regimen.

In a previous post I noted that in the first couple days of office, Dictator Cheeto signed an executive order to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Through my 20s I’ve been very interested in mind/body holistic health. I’ve studied up on nutrition and looked through what’s fact and what’s fad, and the same with alternative remedies.  In my arsenal of prepping I believe learning basic first aid and preventative medicine are vital tools. Keeping my immune system strong so it’s not susceptible to diseases is very important, because if I get sick I won’t be able to afford to see the doctor. And if I do go see the doctor, there is a good chance that doctor could cite “deeply held religious beliefs” and refuse to treat me. So it’s in my best interest to protect and empower myself to understand my body and keep it healthy.

Honey for a cough. The tried and true chicken noodle soup. Tea tree oil for a skin blemish. For a brighter smile brush with baking soda. What these things all have in common is that they can be considered folk medicine!

According to the World Health Organization, Folk Medicine is:

“the sum total of the knowledge, skills, and practices based on the theories, beliefs, and experiences indigenous to different cultures, whether explicable or not, used in the maintenance of health as well as in the prevention, diagnosis, improvement or treatment of physical and mental illness.”

It’s very important to learn how to weed through all the snake oil. Just because blood-letting was once a practiced ‘traditional’remedy doesn’t mean it was ever a good idea.

“A man may esteem himself happy when that which is his food is also his medicine.” -Henry David Thoreau

My kitchen in a lot of ways is a mini apothecary.

A few staples that I keep in my kitchen are:

  • Garlic
  • Cayenne Pepper
  • Green Tea
  • Ginger Root
  • Lemons
  • Raw Honey

Garlic

Garlic is one of the worlds most researched and important medicinal plants (and it adds amazing flavor to most anything!).

Best taken raw, the key actions of this plant is that it’s an antibiotic, anti fungal, lowers blood pressure and cholesterol, supports beneficial intestinal flora, and is an amazing antioxidant keeping free radicals at bay. It’s excellent at preventing the common cold or shortening the length of time if you catch one.   It’s a real immune system booster!

vampire

It also gives you an edge when dealing with not so nice vampires.

I eat about 3-4 cloves a day. I put it on most everything. Potatoes, rice, noodles, pasta, pizza, bread, salad, nachos, tacos, steak, soups, etc.

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne pepper is an amazing spice to add to any meal if you need a kick but it also has some pretty nifty health benefits too.

Cayenne pepper helps fight inflammation and can give your metabolism a much needed boost as well as stimulate the circulatory system. It’s key component, capsaicin, is what makes this pepper spicy. High in vitamins A and C this pepper helps support the immune system.  The heat of this pepper also gives you a nice endorphin rush.
Since cayenne stimulates blood flow, it can be a useful spice to add more spice to your sex drive.

I love to use cayenne in many different dishes and I even like to put cayenne in my ginger lemon honey tea or even make a spicy hot chocolate.

Green Tea

Legend has it that in 3rd century China, Emperor Shen Nung was sitting under a tree boiling water and leaves fell from the tree into his kettle.  He took a sip and found it to be quite delightful, so resulting in the timeless tradition of drinking tea!

Tea is a stimulant with a moderate amount of caffeine which offers a nice pick-me-up(not as much as a cup of coffee though).  It contains high levels of polyphenols, which is an antioxidant that has been found to help weight loss,  and hinder inflammation.

Green tea is also good for focus and helping alleviate depression.  This is because green tea contains the amino acid L-Theanine:

“L-theanine is an amino acid responsible for increasing alpha brain wave activity, which promotes relaxation. In concert with the stimulant caffeine, this allows tea to induce a feeling of increased concentration over a longer period of time, compared to caffeine alone. Some tea merchants will tell you that tea “releases” its caffeine into the body more slowly than coffee, but in actuality, the effects of caffeine are being moderated by L-theanine.”

So besides getting really good focus and antioxidants out of green tea, there are even more benefits to your health:

“Studies have also shown that there are added benefits to tea, besides alertness. In a paper by Eschenauer and Sweet, it was concluded that “increased alpha activity in the brain induced by L-theanine has been associated with increased creativity, increased performance under stress, and improved learning and concentration as well as decreased anxiety.” [2] A 2001 study suggests that the combination of L-theanine and caffeine “improves the ability to multi-task and reduces task-induced fatigue,” [3]

I have around 2 to 3 cups of green tea a day. Matcha green tea contains even higher amounts of L-Theanine. I like to add matcha to my smoothies.

Ginger Root

There’s nothing quite like the zing of fresh raw ginger root! Ginger is anti-inflammatory and may even be used in place of aspirin to treat arthritic pain for those that can’t have aspririn. Personally, I can’t have OTC pain relievers because it flares up severe stomach acid distress.  Ginger has been a life savor for nausea and my aches and pains.

Ginger is also an antioxidant and can improve resistance during a flu or cold.

I like to add raw garlic and raw ginger root to my chicken soup when I feel a hint of a cold coming on.

Lemon

Lemons! An excellent source of vitamin C!  I use lemon almost as much as I use garlic! I like to use it in cooking or have tea with a squeeze of lemon, pinch of cayenne, chunks of ginger, and a spoonful of raw honey.  It’s my nightly ritual.

Raw Honey

Honey. Sweet ambrosia and nectar of the goddess!  Honey is antimicrobial, antibacterial, and chock full of amino acids and vitamins and minerals.  It’s by far my favorite sweetener. Raw honey in particular is minimally processed thereby keeping all of the enzymes and amino acids.

Honey gives the libido a boost and increases stamina. There are also studies that have found honey to be a great anticancer food.

I prefer to buy local raw honey.  Please note that while there are many benefits to raw honey, there are also potential dangers or drawbacks.  For example, honey is full of fructose (hence it being a sweetener) and so adding spoonful after spoonful is extra added calories. Raw honey should never be given to infants because of it’s potential although rare cases of endospores of Clostridium botulinum (the bacteria that can cause botulism) have been found.  The adult digestive system can filter that out but infants systems are not strong enough.

I daydream of having my own self sufficient farm and being a keeper of bees.

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For about a month I’ve been dealing with an infection that has made the  lymph nodes in my neck go into overdrive.  I went to the doctor and got everything all checked out. It’s nothing to be worried about thankfully, however, feeling really worn out all the time while my body is battling this infection has really gotten me down. I decided to ‘level up’ my beginner herbalism skills and make my very first decoction.

In Rosemary Gladstar’s book on medicinal herbs, a decoction is made of woody plant parts, roots and bark, twiggy bits, and other hard parts. It takes a slow simmer for about 45minutes to extract the medicinal properties of these herbs.

In my handy-dandy Herbal Remedies Visual Reference Guide by Andrew Chevallier, I looked up some herbs that would help with lymph draining and fighting infections.

So my first medicinal potion I made:

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Astragalus, Cleavers, Echinacea, Dandelion RootJuniper berries, Raw Ginger, Garlic, Raw honey, dash of cayenne.

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I let it simmer for around 45 minutes.  I put a quart of water in and after simmering it made about 2 cups totals.  I added the honey and cayenne pepper after the finished product.  It didn’t taste bad, but it did taste strange. Like a weird mix of coffee and rootbeer.

I’ve also been taking a hot bath with epsom salts and drops of eucalyptus, tea tree, and peppermint essential oils. I sometimes take an epsom salt soak after a particularly hard day of weight training or long hike.  The science behind whether or not epsom salts work the way other natural holistic health websites say they do is pretty iffy.  I take it with a grain of salt (no pun intended) when it comes to what it may or may not do. I just know that it feels really good and dissipates my stress.  Prolonged stress can lead to susceptibility to disease and the body being unable to regulate inflammation.  So for the most part I use Epsom Salt baths as a way to manage stress.

relax

 

So these are just a few things that I do to take care of myself to prevent getting sick or to take care of myself if I do ever get sick. When I lose access to my health care, I like to believe I stand a good chance of surviving.  However, if the access to my Testosterone is cut that will be another story.  It’s a medicine that can’t be stocked becuase it’s a controlled substance. Things are very uncertain at this period of time.

Until next time,

Ravn Thor

Please comment!

What are some of your favorite Folk Medicines or Remedies?

“Our bodies are our gardens – our wills are our gardeners.”  -William Shakespeare

 

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4 thoughts on “Learning Folk Medicine”

  1. Two useful applications for ginger:

    1] Mince [including skin] and boil hard until water changes tan-brown. I’d say.. 1 cup of minced ginger per.. 3-4 cups water. I’m not sure about that ratio, as I eye-ball it. When it burns going down, you’ve got the right amount. It’s fantastic for a severely sore-throat, cold, flu, etc. Don’t drink more than.. maybe a quart a day; I drank maybe 2 quarts in a day once, and felt odd – though it did alleviate my cold symptoms.

    2] Take a metric shitton of powdered ginger, and place it in a steaming hot bath. Get in there and soak it up. Your body will burn; your body will go into overdrive to deal with the pain, which will of course boost your metabolism. No idea about the possible negative effects.

    Two useful applications for bleach:

    1] Antiseptic and mild cauterizer for minor to moderate wounds: simply apply directly, or soak a rag, then leave it on wound until flesh closes. I consistently use it while on a job, when I don’t have time to worry about pretty wound-care – duct-taping the wet rag on. I would, however, suggest cautious application, as I don’t know if it can get into your bloodstream.

    2] Wart removal. There are different types of warts, and I don’t know to which it is applicable; I’ve personally done this successfully, once – the seed was white.

    Submerge the wart in bleach and wait [a soaked rag should also work, but take far longer]; the corrupted flesh will be eaten away completely, and expose a channel for the wart seed to be forced out of. This takes hours, and all the flesh touched by bleach will also disintegrate dependent on degree of exposure – my elbow looked like a fucking rotten orange peel while healing. Again, be careful that it doesn’t get into your bloodstream.

    Garlic:

    I’m told that, if one minces and boils garlic, the fluid can be poured into the nose for a thorough and rapid clearing of the sinuses. It is, however, painful.

    Meat:

    To fuel blind rages.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m curious to make a very potent ginger syrup or tincture in the future. And I can definitely imagine that garlic would burn the mucus right out XD

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      1. Ah, bleach may also help with athlete’s foot. I’ve had a case that’s followed me for nearly a decade on and off, and I’ve recently been trying bleach. Seems to be working.

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      2. Right on, tea tree oil would help too. If you put a few drops of tea tree oil in with a carrier oil like jojoba or olive oil and rub it on the infection it may help. A couple summers ago I had really bad athletes foot and I tried this method and worked for me.
        But every body is different! Hope it won’t burn.

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